There are four main facial hair patterns identified in a survey we conducted.  They are as follows:

Facial & Neck Hair

When vellus, or fine hairs, are exposed to androgens, especially DHT, it activates the hair follicle to start forming terminal or course hair.  Our focus will involve masculine hair patterns on the face and neck, where once fine peach fuzz grows into course facial hair.  During puberty, facial hair first appears at the sideburns and mustache area.  For some men, this may be the extent of their facial hair.  For others hair begins filling in by spreading onto the cheeks, chin, jawline, and neck.  Facial hair can continue to thicken and spread during early adulthood after puberty is complete.  There are wide differences among various ethnic groups with European/white men having more extensive facial and neck hair growth compared to other racial groups.

FACIAL

One of the most anticipated events for many young men going through puberty is the arrival of facial hair.  Facial hair often begins on the sideburns and upper lip first then spreads from there.  For the mustache, hair usually begins at the outer edges and grows toward the middle. Color can even vary in different areas of the beard, especially in white men (sideburns or mustache may be a different color than the chin or cheeks). 

It may take years after puberty is completed for facial hair to reach its full adult extent and thickness – sometimes not until a man is in his mid30s.[i]    Nearly all men will grow a beard, but the thickness and uniformity of hair growth can vary.  With grooming (trimming and shaving) most adult men are able to grow facial hair in a  number of different styles.  This may involve short, long, or no sideburns, different styles of mustaches, goatees, or beards.

 

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There are different methods for removing or sculpting facial hair.  We will only take a few brief moments to discuss advantages and disadvantages.  Trimming the length of the facial hair can either be performed with scissors or an electric trimmer that often includes a guard.  Electric trimmers lead to a more uniform length but can occasionally tug at facial hair when the battery life runs low.

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Complete removal of facial hair can occur with shaving, either with a blade or an electric razor.  Blades have the advantage of giving a closer shave, but require shaving cream and a moistened face.  If blades are not changed regularly they can dull increase the chances of nicks and cuts as well as infected hair follicles.  Electric razors have the advantage of being used on a dry face; however, they increase the risk of ingrown hairs and can sometimes tug at facial hair and be painful (especially when the facial hair is longer than stubble).

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How frequently one facial hair pattern is seen in men can be influenced by racial/ethic genetic backgrounds.  White/European men are most likely to have facial hair that covers most of all of the beard line (79%) while Asian men are most likely to have sparse or even absent facial hair (56%).  There are four main facial hair patterns of where men do grow hair identified in a survey we conducted.  They are as follows:

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NECK BEARD HAIR

(Front of Neck)

For many men, the facial hair spreads down onto the front of the neck.  There are four main neck beard hair patterns depending on whether the hair extends below, at, or above the Adam's Apple (larynx).  They are as follows:

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How frequently one neck beard hair pattern is seen in men can be influenced by racial/ethic genetic backgrounds.  Once again, White/European men are most likely to have facial hair that covers most of all of the neck (74%) while Asian men are most likely to have sparse or even absent facial hair (65%).

 

 

NECK HAIR

(Back of neck)

Hair on the back of the neck actually comes in three main patterns.  You may notice that some men have little “duck tails” that form at the back of the scalp while others don’t.  These present two of the three different types of neck hair patterns seen in men.  Here are the three types outlined in one study:[ii]

 

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[i] Randall, V. A. (1994), Androgens and human hair growth. Clinical Endocrinology, 40: 439–457. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2265.1994.tb02483.x

[ii] Setty LR, Journal of the National Medical Association, vol 64, No. 3,  May 1972, pp. 239-41.

 

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